Intellectual Property Law Blog

Posts Tagged ‘international IP protection attorneys’

SCOTUS Rules Trademark Disparagement Clause Unconstitutional

June 22nd, 2017

By Bridget Labutta, Esq.  The U.S. Supreme Court recently ruled that the U.S. Trademark Office’s refusal to register “The Slants” as a trademark for an Oregon-based rock band was unconstitutional. This is a case the trademark attorneys at Panitch Schwarze have been watching closely, as this landmark decision could reshape U.S. trademark law significantly. Issued…

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UPC Update: Surprise UK Elections Likely to Delay Start of Unitary Patent System

June 7th, 2017

As we have discussed previously, European Union member countries are completing the final steps to implement an intergovernmental system that will streamline the process for securing and enforcing patent rights across Europe. Having a simpler, centralized system in place will open up a new patent portfolio management strategy for small and medium-sized IP-driven companies.

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U.S. Supreme Court Upsets 30 Years of Precedent, Changing Where Companies Can Be Sued for Patent Infringement

May 22nd, 2017

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday, May 22, 2017, changed the playing field regarding where patent owners can file infringement lawsuits against accused infringers.

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Chinese Companies Awarded More U.S. Patents in 2016

January 31st, 2017

By Weihong Hsing, Esq. and Jibo Wu, Esq. U.S. patent data recently released by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office confirms that IBM was again awarded the most U.S. patents in 2016 – a whopping 8088! Other U.S. companies in the top 10 were Qualcomm, Google, Intel, and Microsoft, with Apple coming in at number…

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USPTO Closer to Recognizing Patent Agent Privilege?

December 9th, 2016

By Carly A. Shanahan, Ph.D. A key element of our justice system, the attorney-client privilege, was put in place to ensure that every citizen can obtain sound legal advice. Confidences discussed with an attorney in order to obtain legal advice are privileged from discovery in litigation. When it comes to the protection of intellectual property…

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Trademarks Update: Supreme Court to Decide Constitutionality of Disparagement Provision

October 20th, 2016

The U.S. Supreme Court is poised to answer a question that has plagued federal trademark law for decades: Does the government have the right to refuse to register trademarks which it has deemed “disparaging?” And, given that the First Amendment prohibits our government from restricting speech, does it make sense to have the U.S. Trademark…

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What Does the Brexit Vote Mean for IP Protection?

July 7th, 2016

By Martin G. Belisario and Bridget H. Labutta As is well known by now, the citizens of Great Britain have chosen to leave the European Union (EU), a move popularly dubbed the “Brexit.” Despite the economic upheaval and media firestorm surrounding the vote, the realm of intellectual property law is unlikely to see any immediate…

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Charged with an IP Crime? Your Lawyer Better Know Science as Well as Criminal Law

May 19th, 2016

When federal agents swarmed the home of Temple University physics professor Xiaoxing Xi and charged him with spying for China, scientists across the country better have taken note. This was an egregious case of an alleged IP crime which turned out to be nothing at all. Unfortunately, it is likely to happen again. Scientists and…

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The Defend Trade Secrets Act: What IP-Driven Companies Need to Know

May 3rd, 2016

By Alan S. Nadel, Esq. When we wrote recently about trade secrets, we noted that enforcement in the United States fell largely to state laws modeled on the Uniform Trade Secrets Act (UTSA), first drafted in 1979. With its signing in February 2016 of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, though, the United States obliged itself to enact…

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When Can Customer Information be Considered a Trade Secret?

November 5th, 2015

By John Simmons, Esq. We’ve recently discussed trade secrets, any information known to you but not to others that gives you a business advantage. While examples such as product designs and secret recipes are good examples of intellectual property that can be treated as trade secrets, we frequently are asked about one business advantage that…

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